Do you feel the Christmas coming already?? 🙂 Do you have your houses decorated? I always promise myself a lot and then things go its own way because things happen, there’s work, trips and everything gets crazy before Christmas. Fortunately this year Maks is my little helper – he already chose a little Christmas tree for his own and obviously an Advent calendar with chocolates. I know, I know that DIY calendars are popular now, but if he wanted an ordinary one with chocolates from Lidl, then why shouldn’t I give him another one? I used to have ones like that and it has always been an essential part of Christmas preparations… I don’t feel like Christmas yet. I miss snow which always makes me feel the Christmas spirit. But there are other ways to achieve that! And if it wasn’t for a lot of things that had to be done in December I’d do it myself in order to feel that Christmas is coming! Christmas fairs in Germany! Have you been there?? We went there in 2013 and it must have been the best December we had! 🙂

 

There’s Christmas fairs in Germany everywhere!!! Reportedly they organise 150 Christmas fairs each year! We’re going to recommend the ones which have enchanted us! 🙂 Go and you won’t regret it!:)

 

1) NUREMBERG

 

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Nuremberg is our no. 1:) We start with the main fair in the city called Christkindlesmarket and located on central Hauptmarkt square. It’s special not only because of the numerous colourful stands with incredible Christmas decorations or festive treats but also thanks to the surroundings of the fair such as a towering cathedral. Not far from it there’s a special fair dedicated to children called Kinderweihnacht – worth giving a try regardless of your age.

Christmas fair on Nuremberg’s main square has been organised since 16th century. Initially the citizens of the city stockpiled on dried fruits, nuts and spices needed for Christmas baked goods during the fair – raisins, dactyls, cloves. Over time the offer expanded and started to include gingerbread and much more later on. Be sure to try my favourite gingerbread cakes fruchtebrot and wash it down with mulled wine. Maks recommends thin sausages from Nuremberg, preferably with a pretzel!

Kids’ fair comes with a small train the kids can ride and magical decorations on the stands. When we were in Nuremberg, Maks was 2.5 years old and he loved it! I guess he’d love it even more right now!:)

 

The fair in Nuremberg will last until Christmas Eve. More information about the city can be found HERE.

 

Christmas fairs, Germany, Nuremberg, what to see in Germany, Christmas in Germany

Nuremberg, Christmas fairs, Christmas fairs in Germany, kids' fair

Nuremberg, Christmas fairs, Christmas fairs in Germany, kids' fair, precle, co jeść in Germany

Christmas fairs, Germany, Nuremberg, what to see in Germany, Christmas in Germany

 

2) DRESDEN

 

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Dresden was the first stop on our Christmas fair trip. We loved the beautifully illuminated carousel and decorated buildings nearby. We walked around the colourful stands wanting to buy something on each of them and loved the atmosphere and the feeling of waiting for Christmas. We quickly went for a curry wurst one of German street food classics. 🙂 You have to try it once in Germany 🙂 and for dessert, one of my favourites – marzipan potatoes which can be found everywhere on the fairs!

 

Christmas fair in Dresden also known as Striezelmarkt is quite special – it’s the oldest Christmas fair in Germany. It was established in 1434! Initially they mainly sold meat required for Christmas meals on it. Over time, baked goods appeared i.e. a traditional Christmas strudel called stollen or striezel.. That’s where the name of the fair comes from. Dresden looks really beautiful in the pre-Christmas period so you should think about going sightseeing too. The must sees include Frauenkirche church, Bruhl’s Terrace, Wettin castle and Semperoper. You can read more about Dresden and the fair HERE.

 

Apart from traditional Striezelmarkt on Altmarkt square there’s plenty of other Christmas fairs in Dresden. Many districts organise their own, smaller ones. We loved Neumarkt where even the salesmen at the stands were dressed like in the old times, transferring us to the times of first fairs.

 

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Dresden, Christmas fairs, German Christmas fairs, Germany, Christmas fair in Dresden, marcepan

Dresden, Christmas fairs, German Christmas fairs, Germany, Christmas fair in Dresden

Dresden, Christmas fairs, German Christmas fairs, Germany, Christmas fair in Dresden, marcepan

 

3) BERLIN

Berlin, Christmas fair, Germany, German Christmas fairs

 

There’s a lot of Christmas fairs in Berlin – in various districts, all different – traditional, for kids, vegetarian. The one on Gendarmenmarkt square must be the most famous one. Amazing surrounding – German cathedral on one side, French one on the other and apart from that – Konzerthaus (concert hall). The fair is similar to the rest: treats, sweets, wooden figures, soaps, candles, loooots of marzipan, wursts and fruits covered in chocolate!

 

My zajrzeliśmy też na jarmark na Postdamer Platz. Nie ma tu klimatu dawnych jarmarków jak choćby w Norymberdze, ale jest karuzela dla dzieciaków i sztuczny stok, na którym można zjeżdżać na pontonach.

 

You can read more about our memories from Berlin HERE. Remember to check up to date the information about specific fairs before you go.

 

Berlin, Christmas fair, Germany, German Christmas fairs

Berlin, Christmas fair, Germany, German Christmas fairs

Berlin, Christmas fair, Germany, German Christmas fairs

Christmas fairs, Germany, Leipzig, German Christmas fairs, gingerbread, fruchtebrod, owoce w czekoladzie

Berlin, Christmas fair, Germany, German Christmas fairs

 

4)LEIPZIG

 

Berlin, Christmas fair, Germany, German Christmas fairs

 

Leipzig was the least memorable part of our trip when it comes to fairs. But on the other hand it amazed us with a meal we did not expect to find in Germany – Leipziger Allerlei. . It’s plenty of vegetables (peas, carrots, broccoli, asparagus), mushrooms or crayfish in our case (traditional version). Allerlei means a mix or a mixture in German and that’s how the plate looks like. It’s all covered with sauce that reminds me of bisque a little bit – a cream soup usually made from crayfish, crabs or lobsters. Allerlei has been a part of Saxon cuisine since 19th or even 18th century! We also liked krappelchen, tiny donuts sold on stands on the fir.

 

Apart from that we drank mulled wine (gluhwein), ate wursts, gingerbread and other German specialties:)

 

We spent 6-7 days in Germany seeing fairs, buying Christmas decorations and eating festive treats! A great introduction to the Christmas mood!:) It’s a pity we couldn’t go to Germany this year and see new cities and new fairs! 🙂

 

Christmas fairs, Germany, Leipzig, German Christmas fairs, gingerbread, fruchtebrod

Christmas fairs, Germany, Leipzig, German Christmas fairs, gingerbread, fruchtebrod

Leipzig, Christmas fairs, allerlei, kuchnia niemiecka

Christmas fairs, Germany, Leipzig, German Christmas fairs, Leipzig, what to buy on Christmas fairs

 

So what? Are you already packing bags and/or kids ? Off you go? You still have some time before Christmas!!! 🙂